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Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

Ready-to-Print

Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

Scroll down to browse available pieces. Click on a title to view more detailed information, including word counts and excerpts.

* - Notes may be displayed on your website for one year following the performance. Contact us to discuss a longer duration.

Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Handel: Water Music No. 1

Handel: Water Music No. 1

60.00

546 words
note by Chris Myers

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Excerpt:

It’s good to be king.
 
But sometimes you have to remind people of the fact, especially if your heir has been stealing the spotlight. That’s the problem King George I was facing in 1717. Prince George II was enjoying widespread popularity among the people of England, throwing extravagant parties, taking a widely publicized tour through southern England, and even allowing commoners to see him dine in public (how modern!). A dramatic assassination attempt at Drury Lane Theatre only served to seal his place in the people’s hearts, and the king realized he needed to do something to remind the nation who really sat on the throne (or so it was rumored… naturally, the monarch would never admit to such motives).
 
And so at 8pm on Wednesday, July 17, 1717, the most impressive public event in recent memory was produced along the River Thames.

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