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Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

Ready-to-Print

Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

Scroll down to browse available pieces. Click on a title to view more detailed information, including word counts and excerpts.

* - Notes may be displayed on your website for one year following the performance. Contact us to discuss a longer duration.

Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Hindemith: Mathis der Maler Symphony

Hindemith: Mathis der Maler Symphony

60.00

714 words
note by Chris Myers

includes image files

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Excerpt:

It’s difficult to overstate Paul Hindemith’s low opinion of the National Socialist Party. Like many Germans, he found it difficult to take them seriously, and it came as a great shock to him when they came to power in 1933. In seeking to decide how he could best use his prominent position to protest the beliefs and ideals he saw being inflicted on his native land, he turned to a concept his publisher had suggested only a year earlier: an opera based on the German Peasants’ War.
 
[...]
 
The message was not lost on those in power. The unstaged work was banned on a direct order from Hermann Göring, and the controversy, which played out in the Berlin newspapers, led to Joseph Goebbels personally and publicly denouncing Hindemith at length in a December 1934 speech before the Reich Chamber of Culture.

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