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Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

Ready-to-Print

Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

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Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488

Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 23, K. 488

60.00

507 words
note by Chris Myers

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Excerpt:

By omitting trumpets and timpani and replacing oboes with clarinets, Mozart created a work with an unusually dark, mellow tone compared to contemporary orchestral pieces. These three concerti were the first of Mozart’s piano concerti to include clarinets in the orchestra, and the instrument was new enough that Mozart felt obligated to include a note allowing them to be replaced by a violin or viola should an orchestra not have any available. As with the composer’s other “late” works (Wolfgang had reached the ripe old age of 30!), the winds play a much more significant role than was usual in pieces of the time. The soloistic nature of the orchestral parts and the overall gentle mood of the piece results in a concerto with the kind of intimacy that one normally finds only in chamber music.

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