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Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

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Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

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Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Prokofiev: Romeo & Juliet Suite No. 2

Prokofiev: Romeo & Juliet Suite No. 2

60.00

639 words
note by Chris Myers

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Excerpt:

In a move which may (and did) raise eyebrows, he decided that Juliet should instead return to life in Romeo’s arms so that the happy couple could dance together into a bright and happy future.
 
Why did he make this choice? The more cynical among us might suspect an attempt at pandering to audiences. When asked at the time, Prokofiev simply said, “living people can dance. The dead cannot.” However, as one might suspect from an artist of Prokofiev’s caliber, the truth seems not to lie in commercial or logistical challenges, both of which he was more than capable of overcoming.
 
In reality, Prokofiev saw in his altered ending a metaphorical display of his devout Christian Science faith, in which death, illness, and pain do not exist, but are merely mental illusions which can be surmounted by faith and spiritual discipline. Naturally, this would not have been a popular explanation in Joseph Stalin’s atheist Soviet Union, so it’s unsurprising that Prokofiev chose to gloss over the question.

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