Argyle Arts
Expand the range of your staff.
Argyle.gif

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

Ready-to-Print

Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

Scroll down to browse available pieces. Click on a title to view more detailed information, including word counts and excerpts.

* - Notes may be displayed on your website for one year following the performance. Contact us to discuss a longer duration.

Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Smetana: The Bartered Bride Overture

Smetana: The Bartered Bride Overture

25.00

139 words. (Recommended companion note: The Sound of the Czechs)
program notes by Chris Myers

Add To Cart

Copyright © 2016 Chris Myers. All rights reserved. Unauthorized distribution or reproduction prohibited.

Prodaná nevěsta (The Bartered Bride) Overture
Bedřich Smetana (1824-1884)
piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani, strings

Composed 1862. First performance: May 30, 1866, Provisional Theatre, Prague. Bedřich Smetana, conductor.

Unlike most opera overtures, Smetana composed this piece before the opera itself. The result is a thrilling romp which sets the mood for the comedy (and, arguably, the entire tradition of Czech classical music) to follow. After a syncopated opening figure played by full orchestra, the strings launch into a moto perpetuo fugato that brings to mind Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro. The winds soon burst in with the rhythmic drive of Bohemian folk dances, and the two themes interact and develop, giving the orchestra a chance to show off its virtuosity until it races to a brilliant conclusion.

View shopping cart

Continue browsing Program Notes & Synopses