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Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depth. Choose from our wide selection of pre-written pieces or commission custom notes that complement your concert story.

Program Notes & Synopses

Enhance your patrons’ experience with notes that highlight the music’s humanity and illuminate its depths.

Custom Notes

Tell your own concert story by commissioning synopses and program notes that fit you needs. Just tell us what you’d like to have, and we'll get back to you with a quote.

Ready-to-Print

Choose from dozens of ready-to-print program notes and synopses which you can download instantly as a digital file, including a license to reproduce the notes in programs and on your website.*

Scroll down to browse available pieces. Click on a title to view more detailed information, including word counts and excerpts.

* - Notes may be displayed on your website for one year following the performance. Contact us to discuss a longer duration.

Ready-to-Print notes and synopses are priced by length. Need something longer or shorter? Submit a Quote Request for Custom Notes to ask for a modified version, and we'll make it happen!

Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

80.00

914 words
note by Chris Myers

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Excerpt:

England’s relationship with music has always been paradoxical. The nation has long possessed a rich musical tradition, with some of the world’s greatest orchestras, opera companies, and concert halls adding to a storied heritage of choral and liturgical music. However the country has rarely managed to produce composers on par with its performers and ensembles. Even the most active concert-goers would be hard-pressed to name a significant English composer active in the two centuries following the death of Henry Purcell in 1695. (Handel? A German import. Sullivan? The Savoy operas owe their success more to W.S. Gilbert’s clever lyrics than Arthur Sullivan’s musical innovation.)
 
English musicians at the turn of the 20th century were acutely aware of this, and it only became more apparent as the nation became reacquainted with past musical glories. The manuscript of Henry Purcell’s The Fairy Queen, for instance, was rediscovered in 1910 and given its first production in over two centuries by Gustav Holst. Many young English composers began looking to past masters like Purcell, Tallis, and Dowland for clues on how to create a canon of English works which could stand proudly beside the German, French, and Italian music that filled the
nation’s concert halls.

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